PERRINPOST.COM
Travel tips from Condé Nast Traveler magazine's Wendy Perrin.
CODE OF ETHICS
Freebies forbidden here! You can trust me because I accept no discounts or payments from any travel company. Learn more.
GET IN TOUCH
Questions: Ask Wendy
Email: wperrin@cntraveler.com
Twitter: wendyperrin
UPDATES ON TWITTER
RECENT COMMENTS
ARCHIVES
FAVORITE TRAVEL TOOLS
SITES WORTH SEEING
Alltop
Boarding Area
BootsnAll Today
Ciao Bambino
The Cranky Flier
The Cruise Log
The Daily Traveler
Delicious Baby
Don's Place
Ed Perkins (Smarter Travel)
Family TravelLogue
Flyertalk
Freakonomics
The Gate
Going Places
Peter Greenberg
High Anxiety
Hotel Hotsheet
Itineraries on Portfolio.com
Joe Sent Me
Johnny Jet
Killing Batteries
Lonely Planet Travel Blog
The Middle Seat
Middle Seat Terminal
Nerd's Eye View
One Mile at a Time
Rick Seaney
Rick Steves
Seat2B
ShipCritic Blog
Soul Travelers 3
Today in the Sky
Travel Deals
Travel Savvy Mom
Treehugger
Upgrade: Travel Better
Viator Travel Blog
View From the Wing
WorldHum
TOPICS COVERED

« Holiday Shopping Online? Get Extra Miles! | Main | Which Travel Medical Insurance Is Best? »

December 13, 2006

Norovirus Outbreaks On Cruise Ships

By Wendy Perrin

This year the Centers for Disease Control recorded more incidents of norovirus--a highly infectious gastrointestinal illness--on cruise ships than ever before. There were 22 outbreaks in which more than 3% of passengers and crew reported norovirus symptoms. Last year, by comparison, there were 14 such outbreaks.

In the latest Travel Weekly, David Forney, chief of the C.D.C.'s Vessel Sanitation Program, notes that the number of people cruising has gone up so, although the total number of cruise passengers stricken by norovirus has increased significantly, the percentage of sick passengers has not. Forney points out that there are norovirus outbreaks all over the U.S.: in restaurants, nursing homes, daycare centers, etc. Every time a cruise ship comes to the U.S. from a foreign port, it is required by law to report to the C.D.C. how many people have been sick. This means, says Forney, "there is a very strong surveillance and reporting system for the cruise lines that doesn't exist anywhere else in the country." It doesn't exist for airlines because passengers aren't onboard a plane long enough for the airline to track whether they've gotten sick from germs onboard.

For the C.D.C.'s tips on how to protect yourself from illness on a cruise ship, click here.


Comments

click to post a comment >